英語学習(日本語訳)「紙の動物園」

本家GIZMODOサイトで公開されているハートフルショートストーリー。
親を持つすべての人にこの感動を伝えたい、という思いで訳しました。

“Paper Menagerie”

「紙の動物園」 by Ken Liu

GIZMODO


One of my earliest memories starts with me sobbing. I refused to be soothed no matter what Mom and Dad tried.

私の記憶の始まりはすすり泣いている場面からだ。母や父が何をしようと私は泣きやまなかった。

Dad gave up and left the bedroom, but Mom took me into the kitchen and sat me down at the breakfast table.

父が諦めてベッドルームを去った後、母は私をキッチンへ連れて行き、朝食用テーブルに座らせた。

“Kan, kan,” she said, as she pulled a sheet of wrapping paper from on top of the fridge. For years, Mom carefully sliced open the wrappings around Christmas gifts and saved them on top of the fridge in a thick stack.

“カン、カン”と母が言い、冷蔵庫の上から包装紙をひっぱる。母は長年、クリスマスギフトの包装紙を丁寧に切り開き、冷蔵庫の上にストックしていた。

She set the paper down, plain side facing up, and began to fold it. I stopped crying and watched her, curious.

母は紙を下に置き、平面を上に向け、折り始めた。私は泣きやみ、彼女を怪訝そうに見つめた。

She turned the paper over and folded it again. She pleated, packed, tucked, rolled, and twisted until the paper disappeared between her cupped hands. Then she lifted the folded-up paper packet to her mouth and blew into it, like a balloon.

紙を上げてはまた折り込む。彼女は両手の間で紙に折り目をつけ、たたみ、押し込み、丸めて、折り曲げた。それから紙の包みを彼女の口まで持ち上げ、風船のように息を吹き込んだ。

“Kan,” she said. “Laohu.” She put her hands down on the table and let go.

「カン」と彼女が言う。「ラーホウ」。母はそれをテーブルの上に置き、両手を離した。

A little paper tiger stood on the table, the size of two fists placed together. The skin of the tiger was the pattern on the wrapping paper, white background with red candy canes and green Christmas trees.

紙で折られた、こぶし2つ分くらいの大きさの小さな虎がテーブル上に立っていた。虎の肌の見た目は包み紙の赤いキャンディロッドとクリスマスツリーだ。

I reached out to Mom’s creation. Its tail twitched, and it pounced playfully at my finger. “Rawrr-sa,” it growled, the sound somewhere between a cat and rustling newspapers.

私は母の作ったそれに手を伸ばした。尻尾がひきつり、私の指の上で遊ぶように跳ねた。「グルル」とそれはうなった。猫とくしゃくしゃの新聞を合わせたような音で。

I laughed, startled, and stroked its back with an index finger. The paper tiger vibrated under my finger, purring.

私はおもしろくなり、驚いて、その背中を人差し指でなでる。紙の虎は私の指の上でゴロゴロと音をならした。

“Zhe jiao zhezhi,” Mom said. This is called origami.

「チィ、チャオ、チェジィ」と母は言った。これは折り紙と呼ばれるものだ。

I didn’t know this at the time, but Mom’s kind was special. She breathed into them so that they shared her breath, and thus moved with her life. This was her magic.

その時の私は母が特別な存在である事に気付いていなかった。彼女は息を吹き込むことでそれらに彼女の命を移すことができたのだ。これが彼女の特別な力だった――。

#
Dad had picked Mom out of a catalog.

父はカタログから母を選んだという。

One time, when I was in high school, I asked Dad about the details. He was trying to get me to speak to Mom again.

私が高校生になったある日、母との馴れ初めを聞いた。父は私にもう一度母と話をさせたがっていた。

He had signed up for the introduction service back in the spring of 1973. Flipping through the pages steadily, he had spent no more than a few seconds on each page until he saw the picture of Mom.

1973年の春、父は紹介サービスに登録した。父は母のページに目を止めるまでほとんど時間をかけなかったらしい。

I’ve never seen this picture. Dad described it: Mom was sitting in a chair, her side to the camera, wearing a tight green silk cheongsam. Her head was turned to the camera so that her long black hair was draped artfully over her chest and shoulder. She looked out at him with the eyes of a calm child.

私は今までこの写真を見た事はなかった。その写真について父が説明した。母はタイトな緑色のシルクのチャイナドレスを着て横向きに椅子に座り、カメラに写っている。顔は正面を向き、彼女の黒髪のロングヘアーが胸と肩の上に乗っている。彼女は落ち着いた子どもの目で父を見つめていた。

“That was the last page of the catalog I saw,” he said.

「私が見たカタログの最後のページだった。」と父が言った。

The catalog said she was eighteen, loved to dance, and spoke good English because she was from Hong Kong. None of these facts turned out to be true.

年は18歳、ダンスが好き、英語が上手で香港出身だと書かれていた。これらはすべて嘘だったけどね。

He wrote to her, and the company passed their messages back and forth. Finally, he flew to Hong Kong to meet her.

父は母に手紙を書いた。紹介会社がメッセージをやりとりし、とうとう父は香港へ飛び、母に会ったとの事だ。

“The people at the company had been writing her responses. She didn’t know any English other than ‘hello’ and ‘goodbye.'”

その会社が彼女の返事を書いていたそうだ。母は英語がわからなかった。「こんにちわ」と「さよなら」を除いて。

What kind of woman puts herself into a catalog so that she can be bought? The high school me thought I knew so much about everything. Contempt felt good, like wine.

どんな女性がそんなカタログに自分自身を掲載するのだろう?高校生の私は知る限りの知識で考えた。ワインのように軽蔑するのは簡単だ。

Instead of storming into the office to demand his money back, he paid a waitress at the hotel restaurant to translate for them.

父は会社に返金を申し出る事なく、ホテルのレストランでウェイトレスにお金を支払い、通訳してもらったという。

“She would look at me, her eyes halfway between scared and hopeful, while I spoke. And when the girl began translating what I said, she’d start to smile slowly.”

「母さんが私を見つめている間、その瞳は不安と希望を折り込んでいるようだった。私が話をしている間ずっとね。そのウエイトレスが私の言っている事を通訳すると、次第に彼女は笑顔になっていったんだ。」

He flew back to Connecticut and began to apply for the papers for her to come to him. I was born a year later, in the Year of the Tiger.

父はコネチカット州に戻り、彼の元へ彼女が来れるよう書類を申請し始めた。
1年後の寅年、私は生まれた――。

#
At my request, Mom also made a goat, a deer, and a water buffalo out of wrapping paper. They would run around the living room while Laohu chased after them, growling. When he caught them he would press down until the air went out of them and they became just flat, folded-up pieces of paper. I would then have to blow into them to re-inflate them so they could run around some more.

私のリクエストで、母は包装紙を使って羊や鹿、水牛を作ってくれた。彼らはリビングを走りまわり、ラーホウがそれを追いかけ、うなる。つかまるとプレスされ、空気が抜けてぺしゃんこになる。彼らがまた走りまわれるよう、私はまた息を吹き込んであげた。

Sometimes, the animals got into trouble. Once, the water buffalo jumped into a dish of soy sauce on the table at dinner. (He wanted to wallow, like a real water buffalo.) I picked him out quickly but the capillary action had already pulled the dark liquid high up into his legs. The sauce-softened legs would not hold him up, and he collapsed onto the table. I dried him out in the sun, but his legs became crooked after that, and he ran around with a limp. Mom eventually wrapped his legs in saran wrap so that he could wallow to his heart’s content (just not in soy sauce).

時々、動物たちはトラブルを起こす。ある夕食時、水牛は醤油のお皿に飛び込んだ。(本当の水牛のように水浴びしたかったようだ)私は素早くつかみ上げたが、毛細管現象はすでに足の中まで浸透していた。醤油で柔らかくなった足は彼を支えることができず、その場にしゃがみこんだ。太陽光で彼を乾かしたが彼の足は曲がったまま。よろよろと走りまわった。その後、母がサランラップで足を巻いて上げたことで水牛は心身ともに水浴びできるようになった。(醤油ではない)

Also, Laohu liked to pounce at sparrows when he and I played in the backyard. But one time, a cornered bird struck back in desperation and tore his ear. He whimpered and winced as I held him and Mom patched his ear together with tape. He avoided birds after that.

また、私が裏庭で遊んでいるとラーホウはよくスズメに飛びかかっていた。しかしある時、追い詰められたスズメの必死の反撃が彼の耳を引き裂いた。ラーホウは尻込みして、すすり泣いた。私は母の所にラーホウを持っていき、テープで補強してもらった。その後、ラーホウは鳥たちを避けるようになった。

And then one day, I saw a TV documentary about sharks and asked Mom for one of my own. She made the shark, but he flapped about on the table unhappily. I filled the sink with water, and put him in. He swam around and around happily. However, after a while he became soggy and translucent, and slowly sank to the bottom, the folds coming undone. I reached in to rescue him, and all I ended up with was a wet piece of paper.

またある時、サメについてのドキュメンタリー番組を見た時に私は母に頼んだ。母はサメを作ってくれたがテーブルの上のそいつはつまらなさそうにはためいていた。シンクに水をため、彼を離した。嬉しそうに泳ぎまわったが、びしょ濡れで透けた後、ゆっくりと底に沈んでしまい、折り目が解けてしまった。私が手を伸ばした時にはただの濡れた紙きれになっていた。

Laohu put his front paws together at the edge of the sink and rested his head on them. Ears drooping, he made a low growl in his throat that made me feel guilty.

ラーホウは前足をシンクの縁に乗せ、その上に彼の頭を休ませていた。彼が低いうなり声をあげるとその垂れ下がった耳に私は罪悪感を感じた。

Mom made a new shark for me, this time out of tin foil. The shark lived happily in a large goldfish bowl. Laohu and I liked to sit next to the bowl to watch the tin foil shark chasing the goldfish, Laohu sticking his face up against the bowl on the other side so that I saw his eyes, magnified to the size of coffee cups, staring at me from across the bowl.

母は新しいサメを私に作ってくれた。今回はアルミホイルだ。そのサメは大きな金魚鉢の中で楽しそうに泳いでいた。ラーホウと私は鉢の中で金魚を追いかける”アルミホイル”サメを見るのが好きだった。ラーホウが鉢に顔を突き出すと鉢の反対側の私からは彼の眼がコーヒーカップ並みの大きさに映るのだ。その目は私を見つめていた――。

#
When I was ten, we moved to a new house across town. Two of the women neighbors came by to welcome us. Dad served them drinks and then apologized for having to run off to the utility company to straighten out the prior owner’s bills. “Make yourselves at home. My wife doesn’t speak much English, so don’t think she’s being rude for not talking to you.”

私が10歳になった頃、町の向こうの新しい家へ引っ越した。隣に住む2人の女性が私たちを訪ねてきた。父は彼女たちに飲み物を出し、用事がある事を告げて、以前の家主の請求書を整理して公益事業会社に出しに行ってしまった。
「どうぞくつろいでください。妻はあまり英語が話せません。どうか皆様に会いにこない事を失礼と思わないでください。」

While I read in the dining room, Mom unpacked in the kitchen. The neighbors conversed in the living room, not trying to be particularly quiet.

私がダイニングで読書している間、母はキッチンで荷ほどきをしていた。隣人たちは特に静かになる事もなくリビングで会話していた。

“He seems like a normal enough man. Why did he do that?”

「彼は十分普通に見えるわね。なんでそんな事を?」

“Something about the mixing never seems right. The child looks unfinished. Slanty eyes, white face. A little monster.”

「混血についてどう思う?その子は未完成なのかしら。細い目、白い肌。小さなお化けのようだわ。」

“Do you think he can speak English?”

「英語は話せると思う?」

The women hushed. After a while they came into the dining room.

女性が静かになった少し後、ダイニングルームに入ってきた。

“Hello there! What’s your name?”

「こんにちわ。あなたの名前は?」

“Jack,” I said.

「ジャック」と私は答えた。

“That doesn’t sound very Chinesey.”

「中国的ではないのね。」

Mom came into the dining room then. She smiled at the women. The three of them stood in a triangle around me, smiling and nodding at each other, with nothing to say, until Dad came back.

その時、母がダイニングに入ってきた。彼女は女性に笑いかけ、三人の女性が三角形になる形で私を囲んで立っていた。父が帰ってくるまで何も話すことなくお互いに笑顔で頷いていた――。

#
Mark, one of the neighborhood boys, came over with his Star Wars action figures. Obi-Wan Kenobi’s lightsaber lit up and he could swing his arms and say, in a tinny voice, “Use the Force!” I didn’t think the figure looked much like the real Obi-Wan at all.

近くに住む少年のマークが彼のスターウォーズフィギュアを持って来た。オビ=ワンのライトセーバーが点灯し、腕を振る。小さな声で「フォースを使え!」とサウンドした。私にはその姿が本物のオビ=ワンには見えなかった。

Together, we watched him repeat this performance five times on the coffee table. “Can he do anything else?” I asked.

コーヒーテーブルの上で私たちは同じ動作を5回見た。私は「他には何かできるの?」と言ってしまった。

Mark was annoyed by my question. “Look at all the details,” he said.

マークはこの質問にいらだち、「もっと細かくみてよ」と言った。

I looked at the details. I wasn’t sure what I was supposed to say.

私はそうしたけれど、何も言う事が見つからなかった。

Mark was disappointed by my response. “Show me your toys.”

マークは私の対応に落胆し、「君のおもちゃを見せてよ」と言ってきた。

I didn’t have any toys except my paper menagerie. I brought Laohu out from my bedroom. By then he was very worn, patched all over with tape and glue, evidence of the years of repairs Mom and I had done on him. He was no longer as nimble and sure-footed as before. I sat him down on the coffee table. I could hear the skittering steps of the other animals behind in the hallway, timidly peeking into the living room.

私は紙の動物の他におもちゃを持っていなかったので、ラーホウを持って来た。これまでで彼はとても擦り切れていてテープや接着剤で補修されてきた。母と私で何年間も修理してきた証だ。彼は以前のように機敏で豊かな足取りではなくなっていた。私は彼をコーヒーテーブルの上に座らせた。背後の廊下からは他の動物たちの足音が聞こえ、こちらを覗いていた。

“Xiao laohu,” I said, and stopped. I switched to English. “This is Tiger.” Cautiously, Laohu strode up and purred at Mark, sniffing his hands.

「シャオ・ラーホウ」と言いかけて、英語に切り替えた。「これは虎です。」ラーホウは静かにマークに歩み寄り、うなり、マークの手の匂いを嗅いだ。

Mark examined the Christmas-wrap pattern of Laohu’s skin. “That doesn’t look like a tiger at all. Your Mom makes toys for you from trash?”

マークはクリスマス模様のラーホウを見つめて言った。「これ虎に見えないよ。お母さんはくず紙で君におもちゃを作ったの?」

I had never thought of Laohu as trash. But looking at him now, he was really just a piece of wrapping paper.

私はラーホウをくず紙と思った事は無かったが、今見つめ直すと確かにただの包装紙に見えてしまった。

Mark pushed Obi-Wan’s head again. The lightsaber flashed; he moved his arms up and down. “Use the Force!”

マークはまたオビ=ワンの頭を押した。ライトセーバーが光り、腕が振り下ろされる。「フォースを使え!」

Laohu turned and pounced, knocking the plastic figure off the table. It hit the floor and broke, and Obi-Wan’s head rolled under the couch. “Rawwww,” Laohu laughed. I joined him.

ラーホウが振り返って飛び跳ね、プラスチックのフィギュアを落とした。それは床に落ちて割れ、オビ=ワンの頭がソファの下に転がった。
「ラウゥゥ!」とラーホウが笑い、私はそれに便乗した。

Mark punched me, hard. “This was very expensive! You can’t even find it in the stores now. It probably cost more than what your dad paid for your mom!”

マークが私を強く殴った。「これ、すごく高いんだぞ!今、お店では手に入らないんだ。きっと君のパパが君のママを買ったお金より高いんだ!」

I stumbled and fell to the floor. Laohu growled and leapt at Mark’s face.

私はつまずき床に崩れた。ラーホウがうなり、マークの顔に飛びかかる。

Mark screamed, more out of fear and surprise than pain. Laohu was only made of paper, after all.

マークが叫んだ。それは痛さではなく恐怖と畏怖のせいだ。ラーホウは詰まるところただの紙製なのだから。

Mark grabbed Laohu and his snarl was choked off as Mark crumpled him in his hand and tore him in half. He balled up the two pieces of paper and threw them at me. “Here’s your stupid cheap Chinese garbage.”

マークはラーホウを掴み、手でくしゃくしゃにして半分に引き裂いた。ラーホウの雄たけびはそのせいで遮られる。マークは2つの紙をまるめて私に投げつけてきた。
「これは君のおろかな安い中国製のゴミくずだ。」

After Mark left, I spent a long time trying, without success, to tape together the pieces, smooth out the paper, and follow the creases to refold Laohu. Slowly, the other animals came into the living room and gathered around us, me and the torn wrapping paper that used to be Laohu.

マークが帰った後、私はラーホウを元に戻そうと必死で紙片をテープで貼り付け続けた。ゆっくりと他の動物たちがリビングに入ってきて私とつい先ほどまでラーホウだった包み紙の周りを囲んだ――。

#
My fight with Mark didn’t end there. Mark was popular at school. I never want to think again about the two weeks that followed.

マークとの戦いはそれで終わらなかった。マークは学校で人気者だった。それから2週間の事について決して思い出したくはない。

I came home that Friday at the end of the two weeks. “Xuexiao hao ma?” Mom asked. I said nothing and went to the bathroom. I looked into the mirror. I look nothing like her, nothing.

2週間たった金曜日の事、私は家に帰った。「シュイシャオ、ハオ、マ?」母が尋ねてきた。私は何も言わず洗面所へ行き、鏡を見た。私はあの人とは違う、何もかも。

At dinner I asked Dad, “Do I have a chink face?”

夕食時、私は父に聞いた。「ボクは中国的な顔をしてると思う?」

Dad put down his chopsticks. Even though I had never told him what happened in school, he seemed to understand. He closed his eyes and rubbed the bridge of his nose. “No, you don’t.”

父は箸を置いた。私は学校であった事を話してはいないが、理解したようだ。彼は眼を閉じ、鼻を撫でた。
「いや、そんな事はないよ。」

Mom looked at Dad, not understanding. She looked back at me. “Sha jiao chink?”

母は父を見たが理解できていないようだ。彼女は私の方に振り向き、言った。「シャ、チャオ、チン?」

“English,” I said. “Speak English.”

「英語で。」僕は言った。「英語で話して。」

She tried. “What happen?”

彼女はつたない英語で聞いた。「何かあったの?」

I pushed the chopsticks and the bowl before me away: stir-fried green peppers with five-spice beef. “We should eat American food.”

私は箸を置き、チンジャオロースのボウルをテーブルの遠くに避けた。
「ボクたちはアメリカ文化の食事を取るべきだ。」

Dad tried to reason. “A lot of families cook Chinese sometimes.”

父が困ったようにその理由を尋ねる。「多くの家族が中華も食べているよ。」

“We are not other families.” I looked at him. Other families don’t have moms who don’t belong.

「ボクたちは他の家族とは違う。」私は父を見た。私たち以外の家族にはこの国に”属していない”母はいない。

He looked away. And then he put a hand on Mom’s shoulder. “I’ll get you a cookbook.”

父は目をそらし、母の肩に手を置いた。「君に料理の本を買ってくるよ。」

Mom turned to me. “Bu haochi?”

母は私の方に向き言った「ブ、ハオチ?」

“English,” I said, raising my voice. “Speak English.”

「英語で。」怒りを込めて私は言う「英語で言って。」

Mom reached out to touch my forehead, feeling for my temperature. “Fashao la?”

母は私のおでこに手を伸ばし、熱を計った。「フェーシャオ、ラ?」

I brushed her hand away. “I’m fine. Speak English!” I was shouting.

私は彼女の手を振り払い、「ボクは大丈夫だよ。英語で話して!」と叫んだ。

“Speak English to him,” Dad said to Mom. “You knew this was going to happen some day. What did you expect?”

「ジャックには英語で話すんだ」と父が言った。
「いつかはこんな日がくると分かっていただろう。違うかい?」

Mom dropped her hands to her side. She sat, looking from Dad to me, and back to Dad again. She tried to speak, stopped, and tried again, and stopped again.

母は手を横に下ろし座った。父から私へ目線を送り、もう一度父を見た。彼女は喋りかけてはやめ、それを繰り返した。

“You have to,” Dad said. “I’ve been too easy on you. Jack needs to fit in.”

「君はやらなきゃならない。」父は言う。「私は君に甘すぎた。ジャックは周りの人たちに合わせる事を必要としてる。」

Mom looked at him. “If I say ‘love,’ I feel here.” She pointed to her lips. “If I say ‘ai,’ I feel here.” She put her hand over her heart.

母が父の方を向いて言う。「私は”love”と言葉にした時、ここにいるように感じます。」と、自分の唇を指さす。
そして、自分の胸に手を置いて「”愛”と言葉にすると、私はここにいるように感じます。」と言った。

Dad shook his head. “You are in America.”

父は首を振り、諭した。「君はアメリカにいるんだよ。」

Mom hunched down in her seat, looking like the water buffalo when Laohu used to pounce on him and squeeze the air of life out of him.

彼女は椅子に身をかがめ、まるでラーホウに襲いかかられ、空気を抜かれたあの水牛のように見えた。

“And I want some real toys.”

「あと、ボク、本当のオモチャが欲しい――。」

#
Dad bought me a full set of Star Wars action figures. I gave the Obi-Wan Kenobi to Mark.

父はスターウォーズのアクションフィギュアの完全セットを買ってくれた。オビ=ワン・ケノービはマークにあげた。

I packed the paper menagerie in a large shoebox and put it under the bed.

大きな靴の箱に紙の動物たちを詰め込み、ベッドの下に置いた。

The next morning, the animals had escaped and took over their old favorite spots in my room. I caught them all and put them back into the shoebox, taping the lid shut. But the animals made so much noise in the box that I finally shoved it into the corner of the attic as far away from my room as possible.

次の朝、動物たちは私の部屋の中のそれぞれのお気に入りの場所に逃げていた。私は全部を箱に戻し、テープで閉じこめた。それでも動物たちは箱の中で騒ぐのでついには屋根裏のできるだけ部屋から離れた角に押し込んだ。

If Mom spoke to me in Chinese, I refused to answer her. After a while, she tried to use more English. But her accent and broken sentences embarrassed me. I tried to correct her. Eventually, she stopped speaking altogether if I were around.

もし母が中国語で話しかけてきたら、何も返さないようにした。しばらくして、彼女は英語を頑張るようになった。しかし、母のアクセントとめちゃくちゃな文脈が、私は恥ずかしかった。彼女に正しい英語を教えたが、結局、私が近くにいる時は何も話さなくなってしまった。

Mom began to mime things if she needed to let me know something. She tried to hug me the way she saw American mothers did on TV. I thought her movements exaggerated, uncertain, ridiculous, graceless. She saw that I was annoyed, and stopped.

母は私に何か伝えようとする時、ジャスチャーを使うようになった。アメリカのテレビ番組で見た方法で私をハグしようとした。私は彼女の行動が大げさで間違っており、ばかげた大人げない行動だと思った。私がイライラしているのを見て、彼女はそれをやめた。

“You shouldn’t treat your mother that way,” Dad said. But he couldn’t look me in the eyes as he said it. Deep in his heart, he must have realized that it was a mistake to have tried to take a Chinese peasant girl and expect her to fit in the suburbs of Connecticut.

「母親にそのような接し方をするんじゃない。」父は私を諭した。しかし父は私をまっすぐ見つめることはできなかった。
心の奥底では中国の農民であった彼女をコネチカットの郊外に習わそうとしたことが間違いだと気づいていたようだ。

Mom learned to cook American style. I played video games and studied French.

母はアメリカ料理を学んだ。私はビデオゲームで遊び、フランス語を勉強した。

Every once in a while, I would see her at the kitchen table studying the plain side of a sheet of wrapping paper. Later a new paper animal would appear on my nightstand and try to cuddle up to me. I caught them, squeezed them until the air went out of them, and then stuffed them away in the box in the attic.

時々、母がキッチンのテーブルで包み紙を使って折り紙をしているのを見かけた。その後、新たな紙動物はナイトスタンドに現れては私に寄り添おうとしたが、私はそれらを掴み取り、空気を抜いた後、屋根裏の箱に押し込んだ。

Mom finally stopped making the animals when I was in high school. By then her English was much better, but I was already at that age when I wasn’t interested in what she had to say whatever language she used.

私が高校生になった頃、母はとうとう動物を作るのをやめた。その頃には彼女の英語はずいぶん良くなった。
だが、その歳になった私は彼女が使う言葉が何であろうが興味がなくなっていた、

Sometimes, when I came home and saw her tiny body busily moving about in the kitchen, singing a song in Chinese to herself, it was hard for me to believe that she gave birth to me. We had nothing in common. She might as well be from the moon. I would hurry on to my room, where I could continue my all-American pursuit of happiness.

時々、私が家に帰った時、キッチンで彼女の小さな体が忙しく動きまわっていて中国語の鼻歌を口ずさんでいるのを見た時、自分自身が彼女から生まれてきた事が信じられないと思った。私たちには何も共通点がない。彼女は遠い月から来たのかもしれない。私は自分の部屋へ急ぎ、私のアメリカ人としての幸せを追い求めた――。

#
Dad and I stood, one on each side of Mom, lying on the hospital bed. She was not yet even forty, but she looked much older.

父と私は病院のベッドに横たわる母の両脇に立っていた。彼女はまだ40歳にもなっていなかったが、とても年老いているように見えた。

For years she had refused to go to the doctor for the pain inside her that she said was no big deal. By the time an ambulance finally carried her in, the cancer had spread far beyond the limits of surgery.

母は何年もの間、体の痛みを医者にみてもらう事を拒み続けた。彼女は大したことではないと言っていた。救急車が運び込んだ時には、癌は手術の遠く及ばないところまで広がっていた。

My mind was not in the room. It was the middle of the on-campus recruiting season, and I was focused on resumes, transcripts, and strategically constructed interview schedules. I schemed about how to lie to the corporate recruiters most effectively so that they’ll offer to buy me. I understood intellectually that it was terrible to think about this while your mother lay dying. But that understanding didn’t mean I could change how I felt.

私の心は部屋の中になかった。それは私がその時、学内の就職シーズンの真っただ中におり、履歴書や翻訳作業、面接対策に忙しかったからだ。企業の採用担当が私を買うよう、どのように自分を繕うかを考えていた。母親が死にかけている時にそんな事を考えるのはひどい事だと頭では理解していたが、気持ちは変えられなかった。

She was conscious. Dad held her left hand with both of his own. He leaned down to kiss her forehead. He seemed weak and old in a way that startled me. I realized that I knew almost as little about Dad as I did about Mom.

母にまだ意識はあった。父は母の左手を両手で包み、身を乗り出して彼女の額にキスをした。父が弱く年老いて見えた事に驚いた。その時私は、母同様、父についてもよく知っていない事に気付いた。

Mom smiled at him. “I’m fine.”

母は父に笑いかけた。「大丈夫よ。」

She turned to me, still smiling. “I know you have to go back to school.” Her voice was very weak and it was difficult to hear her over the hum of the machines hooked up to her. “Go. Don’t worry about me. This is not a big deal. Just do well in school.”

彼女は笑顔のまま私の方に向いた。「学校に戻らなきゃならないでしょ。」彼女の声はとても弱々しく、つながれた機械が鳴らす音で聞き取るのも困難だった。「行きなさい。心配しなくていいから。大したことではない。学校の方が大事よ。」

I reached out to touch her hand, because I thought that was what I was supposed to do. I was relieved. I was already thinking about the flight back, and the bright California sunshine.

私は手を伸ばし、母の手に触れた。そうすべきだと思ったからだ。そしてホッとした。私はもう帰りの飛行機の事とカリフォルニアの太陽の事を考えていた。

She whispered something to Dad. He nodded and left the room.

彼女は父に小さく声をかけた。父は頷き、部屋を出た。

“Jack, if ? ” she was caught up in a fit of coughing, and could not speak for some time. “If I don’t make it, don’t be too sad and hurt your health. Focus on your life. Just keep that box you have in the attic with you, and every year, at Qingming, just take it out and think about me. I’ll be with you always.”

「いい、ジャック。」彼女は時々咳込んで言葉をつまらせながら語った。「もし私が治らなくても、あまり悲しまないで、体に気を付けて。あなたの人生に集中してね。ただ屋根裏の箱を大事にして。そして毎年、清明節には彼らを外に出してあげて。その時、私の事を思い出してください。私はいつもあなたと一緒にいる。」

Qingming was the Chinese Festival for the Dead. When I was very young, Mom used to write a letter on Qingming to her dead parents back in China, telling them the good news about the past year of her life in America. She would read the letter out loud to me, and if I made a comment about something, she would write it down in the letter too. Then she would fold the letter into a paper crane, and release it, facing west. We would then watch, as the crane flapped its crisp wings on its long journey west, towards the Pacific, towards China, towards the graves of Mom’s family.

父によると清明節は中国のお祭りなのだそうだ。私が幼かった時、清明節には母は中国の亡くなった親御さん達へ毎年手紙を送っていた。それまでのアメリカでの彼女の人生の良い知らせを彼らに知らせるために。彼女は大きな声で手紙を読み、もし私が何か言ったらそれを手紙に書き留めていた。それから彼女はその紙を折り鶴にして西へ放つ。鶴がその折り目のある羽を羽ばたかせ、西へ向け、太平洋へ。中国へ。母の家族たちのお墓へと長い旅へ向かうのを私たちは見ていた。

It had been many years since I last did that with her.

彼女が最後にそれをした時から長い年月が経っていた。

“I don’t know anything about the Chinese calendar,” I said. “Just rest, Mom. “

「ボクには中国の暦が分からないよ。」私は言った。「もう休んで、母さん。」

“Just keep the box with you and open it once in a while. Just open ? ” she began to cough again.

「箱を大事にして。たまに開けてください。開けてみてください。」彼女はまたせき込んだ。

“It’s okay, Mom.” I stroked her arm awkwardly.

「わかったよ、母さん。」私はぎこちなく彼女の腕を撫でた。

“Haizi, mama ai ni ? ” Her cough took over again. An image from years ago flashed into my memory: Mom saying ai and then putting her hand over her heart.

「ハイシィ、ママ、アイ、ニィ?」彼女はまたせき込んだ。何年も前の記憶が私の頭によぎった。母が「愛」と言った時、彼女は自分の胸に手を当てていた。

“Alright, Mom. Stop talking.”

「わかったよ、母さん。もう休んで。」

Dad came back, and I said that I needed to get to the airport early because I didn’t want to miss my flight.

父が戻ってきた。私は飛行機を乗り過ごしたくなかったため、空港に急いでいることを告げた。

She died when my plane was somewhere over Nevada.

私が飛行機に乗ってネバダ州の上空にいる時、母は亡くなった――。

#
Dad aged rapidly after Mom died. The house was too big for him and had to be sold. My girlfriend Susan and I went to help him pack and clean the place.

父は母が亡くなってからあっという間に年老いた。家は彼にとって大きすぎ、売らなければならなかった。ガールフレンドのスーザンと私が荷造りと掃除を手伝いにきた。

Susan found the shoebox in the attic. The paper menagerie, hidden in the uninsulated darkness of the attic for so long, had become brittle and the bright wrapping paper patterns had faded.

スーザンが屋根裏で靴箱を見つけた。長い間、断熱されていない屋根裏の暗闇の中に隠されていた紙の動物たちはその包装紙のパターンが色褪せていた。

“I’ve never seen origami like this,” Susan said. “Your Mom was an amazing artist.”

「私、こんな折り紙見たことないわ。あなたのお母さんってすごいアーティストね。」とスーザンが言った。

The paper animals did not move. Perhaps whatever magic had animated them stopped when Mom died. Or perhaps I had only imagined that these paper constructions were once alive. The memory of children could not be trusted.

紙の動物達は動かなかった。たぶん母が亡くなった時に、その魔法は解けたのだろう。いや、ひょっとしたらこの紙たちが生きていたのは私の頭の中だけだったのかもしれない。子どもの頃の記憶などあてにはならない――。

#
It was the first weekend in April, two years after Mom’s death. Susan was out of town on one of her endless trips as a management consultant and I was home, lazily flipping through the TV channels.

4月の最初の週末、母の命日から2年が経っていた。スーザンは経営コンサルタントとして長い旅に出ており、私は1人、家でテレビの番組をザッピングしていた。

I paused at a documentary about sharks. Suddenly I saw, in my mind, Mom’s hands, as they folded and refolded tin foil to make a shark for me, while Laohu and I watched.

サメについてのドキュメンタリーで手を止めた。突然、頭に思い浮かんだ。母の手が私のためにアルミホイルでサメを折ってくれた事、それをラーホウと私が見つめていた事。

A rustle. I looked up and saw that a ball of wrapping paper and torn tape was on the floor next to the bookshelf. I walked over to pick it up for the trash.

ガサガサ。
見上げると本棚の隣の床に丸められたラッピングペーパーと破れたテープの塊が見えた。
私はゴミを拾おうと歩み寄った。

The ball of paper shifted, unfurled itself, and I saw that it was Laohu, who I hadn’t thought about in a very long time. “Rawrr-sa.” Mom must have put him back together after I had given up.

紙のボールが移動し、広がり、それが”ラーホウ”である事に私は気付いた。とても長い間考えてもいなかったものだ。
「グルル」 あの時、私が諦めた後、母が元に戻したに違いない。

He was smaller than I remembered. Or maybe it was just that back then my fists were smaller.

私の記憶よりとても小さく見えた。いやきっと、当時の私の拳が小さかっただけなのだろう。

Susan had put the paper animals around our apartment as decoration. She probably left Laohu in a pretty hidden corner because he looked so shabby.

スーザンは私たちのアパートメントの装飾品として紙の動物達を置いていた。彼女の目にはラーホウがみずぼらしく見えたのでより隠された場所に置いたのだろう。

I sat down on the floor, and reached out a finger. Laohu’s tail twitched, and he pounced playfully. I laughed, stroking his back. Laohu purred under my hand.

私は床に座り、指を伸ばした。ラーホウのしっぽが引きつり、じゃれてきた。私は笑い、彼の背中を撫でた。ラーホウは私の手の下でゴロゴロと喉を鳴らした。

“How’ve you been, old buddy?”

「元気だったかい、ラーホウ?」

Laohu stopped playing. He got up, jumped with feline grace into my lap, and proceeded to unfold himself.

ラーホウはじゃれるのをやめ、立ちあがり、私の膝の中に猫のように飛び乗った。そして自分自身を広げた。

In my lap was a square of creased wrapping paper, the plain side up. It was filled with dense Chinese characters. I had never learned to read Chinese, but I knew the characters for son, and they were at the top, where you’d expect them in a letter addressed to you, written in Mom’s awkward, childish handwriting.

私の膝の中で、四角い、折り目のある包装紙の平らな面が上を向き、そこにはびっしりと中国語が書いてあった。
私は中国語を学んだ事がなかったが、息子という文字は知っていた。
母のぎこちない、つたない手書きでその文頭に書かれていた。

I went to the computer to check the Internet. Today was Qingming.

私はパソコンの前へ行き、インターネットで調べた。今日は清明節だ――。

#
I took the letter with me downtown, where I knew the Chinese tour buses stopped. I stopped every tourist, asking, “Nin hui du zhongwen ma?” Can you read Chinese? I hadn’t spoken Chinese in so long that I wasn’t sure if they understood.

私は手紙を持って中国ツアーバスがよく停まるダウンタウンへ向かった。観光客を呼びとめ、お願いした。
「ニン、ホェン、ドゥ、ジョンウェン、マ?」中国語が読めますか?
私は長い間、中国語を話していなかったため、彼らに伝わっているか不安だった。

A young woman agreed to help. We sat down on a bench together, and she read the letter to me aloud. The language that I had tried to forget for years came back, and I felt the words sinking into me, through my skin, through my bones, until they squeezed tight around my heart.

若い女性が手を差し伸べてくれた。私たちはベンチに座り、彼女は手紙を私に向けて読みあげてくれた。何年も忘れようとした言葉が帰ってきた。そしてその言葉は私の肌を通して、骨を通して、私の心をきつく絞りあげるほど、私の中に沈み込んでいくのを感じた――。

#
Son,

息子へ。

We haven’t talked in a long time. You are so angry when I try to touch you that I’m afraid. And I think maybe this pain I feel all the time now is something serious.

私たちは長い時間話していませんね。私が触れようとするとあなたは怒ってしまいます。私はそれがとても怖い。今常に感じているこの痛みがとても根強いものだと思っています。

So I decided to write to you. I’m going to write in the paper animals I made for you that you used to like so much.

なのであなたに手紙を書く事に決めました。あなたが以前とても好きだった紙の動物たちに。

The animals will stop moving when I stop breathing. But if I write to you with all my heart, I’ll leave a little of myself behind on this paper, in these words. Then, if you think of me on Qingming, when the spirits of the departed are allowed to visit their families, you’ll make the parts of myself I leave behind come alive too. The creatures I made for you will again leap and run and pounce, and maybe you’ll get to see these words then.

動物たちは私が死ぬとその動きを止めるでしょう。でも、もし私がこの気持ちすべてを書けたなら、これらの言葉でこの紙の上に私自身を少しでも残せると思います。それから、解き放たれた魂が家族の元へ訪れることを許してもらえた時、もしあなたが清明節で私の事を思ってくれたら、私の残したかけらを生き生きとさせます。私があなたのために作った折り物達は飛び跳ねて、走りまわり、じゃれつきます。そしてあなたはこの言葉たちを見つけてくれる事でしょう。

Because I have to write with all my heart, I need to write to you in Chinese.

私のすべての気持ちを書き残すため、中国語で書かせてください。

All this time I still haven’t told you the story of my life. When you were little, I always thought I’d tell you the story when you were older, so you could understand. But somehow that chance never came up.

これまで私は私の人生についてあなたに話した事がありませんでした。あなたが小さい頃、私が歳をとったら、あなたが理解できるようになったら、話そうと思っていました。でも、どういうわけかその機会は訪れる事はありませんでした。

I was born in 1957, in Sigulu Village, Hebei Province. Your grandparents were both from very poor peasant families with few relatives. Only a few years after I was born, the Great Famines struck China, during which thirty million people died. The first memory I have was waking up to see my mother eating dirt so that she could fill her belly and leave the last bit of flour for me.

私は1957年に、河北省のシグル村で生まれました。あなたの祖父母はとても貧しく、親戚も多くありません。私が生まれた後の数年、中国を大飢饉が襲いました。この間だけで3000万人の人々が亡くなりました。私の最初の記憶は、目覚めた時、少しだけ残された小麦を私に与えて自分の空腹を満たすために、土を食べている母の姿です。

Things got better after that. Sigulu is famous for its zhezhi papercraft, and my mother taught me how to make paper animals and give them life. This was practical magic in the life of the village. We made paper birds to chase grasshoppers away from the fields, and paper tigers to keep away the mice. For Chinese New Year my friends and I made red paper dragons. I’ll never forget the sight of all those little dragons zooming across the sky overhead, holding up strings of exploding firecrackers to scare away all the bad memories of the past year. You would have loved it.

その後状況は良くなり、シグル村は折り紙で有名になりました。そして私の母は紙の動物とそれらに命を吹き込む方法を教えてくれました。これは村の生活において、とても実用的な魔法でした。私たちは紙の鳥を作って畑からバッタを追いやったり、紙の虎はネズミを追い払ってくれました。中国の新年のお祝いに、友達と私で赤い紙の龍を作りました。
小さな龍達が急上昇し、頭上で空を横切り、過去1年の悪い思い出を振り払うために連鎖する爆竹が発破していく姿を私は決して忘れることはないでしょう。あなたもきっとそれを好きになったと思います。

Then came the Cultural Revolution in 1966. Neighbor turned on neighbor, and brother against brother. Someone remembered that my mother’s brother, my uncle, had left for Hong Kong back in 1946, and became a merchant there. Having a relative in Hong Kong meant we were spies and enemies of the people, and we had to be struggled against in every way. Your poor grandmother ? she couldn’t take the abuse and threw herself down a well. Then some boys with hunting muskets dragged your grandfather away one day into the woods, and he never came back.

その後の1966年に文化革命が起きました。隣人が隣人を、兄弟がその兄弟を刺激して行きました。誰かが、私の母の兄である叔父が1946年に香港に渡り商人になった事を覚えていました。香港に親戚がいるという事は私たちが中国のスパイや敵となる事を意味していました。私たちはあらゆる面で苦労する事になりました。あなたの貧しいおばあちゃんはどうしたか?彼女は罵倒に耐えきれず自ら井戸に身を捨てました。狩猟用のマスケット銃を持った何人かの若者があなたのおじいちゃんをある日森に引きずり込み、決して戻ってくる事はありませんでした。

There I was, a ten-year-old orphan. The only relative I had in the world was my uncle in Hong Kong. I snuck away one night and climbed onto a freight train going south.

私は10歳で孤児になりました。私の親類は香港に住む叔父だけだった。私はある夜こっそりとそこを離れ、南へ向かう貨物列車に乗り込みました。

Down in Guangdong Province a few days later, some men caught me stealing food from a field. When they heard that I was trying to get to Hong Kong, they laughed. “It’s your lucky day. Our trade is to bring girls to Hong Kong.”

数日後、広東省で降りて、畑から食べ物を盗んでいたところを男達に捕まりました。私が香港に行く事を告げたとき、彼らは笑いました。「君はラッキーだ。私たちの仕事は香港に女の子を連れていくことなんだよ。」

They hid me in the bottom of a truck along with other girls, and smuggled us across the border.

彼らは他の女の子達と一緒にトラックの底に私たちを隠して、国境を越え密輸しました。

We were taken to a basement and told to stand up and look healthy and intelligent for the buyers. Families paid the warehouse a fee and came by to look us over and select one of us to “adopt.”

私たちは地下に連れて行かれ、買い手にとって健康で知的に見えるよう立てと言われました。買い手の家族達は倉庫に料金を支払い、私たちを見渡し、選択し「受け入れ」ました。

The Chin family picked me to take care of their two boys. I got up every morning at four to prepare breakfast. I fed and bathed the boys. I shopped for food. I did the laundry and swept the floors. I followed the boys around and did their bidding. At night I was locked into a cupboard in the kitchen to sleep. If I was slow or did anything wrong I was beaten. If the boys did anything wrong I was beaten. If I was caught trying to learn English I was beaten.

チン家族が2人の息子の世話をさせるため私を連れて行きました。私は毎朝4人分の朝食を準備しました。私は男の子達に食事を与え入浴させました。買い出しをし、洗濯をし、床掃除をしました。男の子達をフォローし、案内したりしました。夜はキッチンの食器棚に閉じ込まり寝ていました。私がゆっくりしていたり、よくない事をするとぶたれました。男の子達が悪い事をしても私がぶたれました。英語を学ぼうとしてもぶたれました。

“Why do you want to learn English?” Mr. Chin asked. “You want to go to the police? We’ll tell the police that you are a mainlander illegally in Hong Kong. They’d love to have you in their prison.”

「なんで英語なんか勉強したいんだ?」チンさんに聞かれました。「警察に行きたいのか?お前が本土から違法に香港に来ていることを話してきてやろうか。彼らは喜んでお前を刑務所に入れてくれるだろうな。」

Six years I lived like this. One day, an old woman who sold fish to me in the morning market pulled me aside.

6年間、このように過ごしていました。ある日、朝市で魚を売ってくれたお婆さんが私を脇道へ引っ張りました。

“I know girls like you. How old are you now, sixteen? One day, the man who owns you will get drunk, and he’ll look at you and pull you to him and you can’t stop him. The wife will find out, and then you will think you really have gone to hell. You have to get out of this life. I know someone who can help.”

「お前みたいな子を私はよく知ってる。歳はいくつだい。16かい?きっとある日お前の主人は酔った勢いでお前を引きよせる。そしてお前は彼を止めることはできない。その妻がそれを知ったならお前は本当の地獄を見る事になる。お前はこの人生から抜け出さなきゃならない。手助けしてくれる人を私は知ってる。」

She told me about American men who wanted Asian wives. If I can cook, clean, and take care of my American husband, he’ll give me a good life. It was the only hope I had. And that was how I got into the catalog with all those lies and met your father. It is not a very romantic story, but it is my story.

彼女はアジア人の妻を欲しがっているアメリカ人について教えてくれました。私が料理、掃除、夫の世話をしさえすればその彼は私に良い人生をプレゼントしてくれると。それが私にとっての唯一の希望でした。そしてそれがあなたのお父さんと会うために私が嘘で塗り固めたカタログに載ったいきさつです。あまりロマンティックとはいえない、それが私のストーリーです。

In the suburbs of Connecticut, I was lonely. Your father was kind and gentle with me, and I was very grateful to him. But no one understood me, and I understood nothing.

コネチカットの郊外で私は孤独でした。あなたのお父さんは私にやさしく、紳士的でした。私は彼にとても感謝しています。
でも誰も私を理解してくれる人はおらず、私も何もわかりませんでした。

But then you were born! I was so happy when I looked into your face and saw shades of my mother, my father, and myself. I had lost my entire family, all of Sigulu, everything I ever knew and loved. But there you were, and your face was proof that they were real. I hadn’t made them up.

でも、アナタが生まれました! 私はとても幸せでした。私の母、私の父、そして私の、顔立ちと色合いがそこにある。私はシグル村で家族をすべて失いました。私の知っている愛していたものすべて。でも、アナタが生まれた。アナタの顔が彼らが存在したことを証明してくれる。私はそれを築き上げたかった。

Now I had someone to talk to. I would teach you my language, and we could together remake a small piece of everything that I loved and lost. When you said your first words to me, in Chinese that had the same accent as my mother and me, I cried for hours. When I made the first zhezhi animals for you, and you laughed, I felt there were no worries in the world.

今、私は話せる人がいます。私はあなたに私の言葉を教え、私が愛しそして失ったすべてを小さな形から一緒に作り直すことができます。あなたが私に言った最初の言葉、私の母と私と同じアクセントの中国語。私は何時間も泣きました。私が作った折り紙の動物でアナタが笑った時、この世界に心配することなど何もないと感じました。

You grew up a little, and now you could even help your father and I talk to each other. I was really at home now. I finally found a good life. I wished my parents could be here, so that I could cook for them, and give them a good life too. But my parents were no longer around. You know what the Chinese think is the saddest feeling in the world? It’s for a child to finally grow the desire to take care of his parents, only to realize that they were long gone.

あなたが少し成長し、お父さんと私をお互いに話せるようにしてくれました。私は今本当の家を手に入れた。私はとうとう最高の人生を見つけた。願わくばここに私の両親を連れて、彼らに料理をし、この人生を味わってほしかった。でも両親はもはやこの世にいません。中国の人々が世界で一番悲しいと感じることを知っていますか?子どもが成長して親の世話をしたいと思っても彼らがもういないと気付いた時です。

Son, I know that you do not like your Chinese eyes, which are my eyes. I know that you do not like your Chinese hair, which is my hair. But can you understand how much joy your very existence brought to me? And can you understand how it felt when you stopped talking to me and won’t let me talk to you in Chinese? I felt I was losing everything all over again.

愛しい息子よ、アナタが私のような中国人の目を好きでないことをわかってます。私のような中国人の髪質を好きでないことも。でもあなたの尊い存在が私にもたらしたものの大きさが分かりますか?そして、あなたが私との会話を止めたとき、中国語で私に話させてくれないあの時の感情を理解できますか?私はまたすべてを失ったように感じました。

Why won’t you talk to me, son? The pain makes it hard to write.

なぜ私と話してくれないの? この痛みはとうてい書き表すことができません――。

#
The young woman handed the paper back to me. I could not bear to look into her face.

若い女性が私に紙を戻した。私は彼女の顔を見る事ができなかった。

Without looking up, I asked for her help in tracing out the character for ai on the paper below Mom’s letter. I wrote the character again and again on the paper, intertwining my pen strokes with her words.

私は顔を上げる事ができず、その若い女性に母の手紙の中の”愛”という字の場所を教えてくれるようお願いした。私は何度も、何度も何度も紙の上で書いた。私のペンストロークを母の言葉に重ねながら。

The young woman reached out and put a hand on my shoulder. Then she got up and left, leaving me alone with my mother.

若い女性が手を伸ばし、私の肩に置いた。彼女が立ちあがって去り、私を1人にしれくれた。母と共に。

Following the creases, I refolded the paper back into Laohu. I cradled him in the crook of my arm, and as he purred, we began the walk home.

折り目にそって、私はその紙をラーホウに折り戻した。私は腕の中で彼を抱きしめ、彼は喉を鳴らす。
そして私たちは家路を歩き始めた。

Copyright (c) 2011 Ken Liu, first published in THE MAGAZINE OF FANTASY & SCIENCE FICTION, Mar/Apr. 2011.

コメントを残す

メールアドレスが公開されることはありません。